Special Events

 JUN
22

Author Talk
12-1 pm, Portland Public Library, 5 Monument Square, Portland Maine
207-871-1700

One with the Sea, O'Leary

One with the Sea

About the Book

Here is a refreshing story that will renew your confidence in America's enduring entre­preneurial spirit, as well as the opportunities it offers all its citizens. Follow a young Richard O'Leary—the only son of an Irish immigrant, raised in Auburn, Maine, in homes devoid of material wealth but rich in human dignity. It was in those early years that Richard learned values from a wise and illiterate father whose goodness and work ethic were inspirational to his son.

The first in his family to graduate from college, soon thereafter he was sending letters home to a proud family about his voyages traversing the high seas as an officer in the United States Navy and the Merchant Marine. Then came what would be the first of many outward signs of the confidence Richard inspired in others when he was assigned to the world's most elite officer team, on the bridge of the world's greatest passenger liner, the SS United States—holder of the world speed record for a transatlantic crossing to this day.

His ascent included serving as the youngest Commandant of Midshipmen at the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York. But, in mid-career he made an abrupt change to enter the world of business. It was a sweeping adventure, full of the ups and downs that accompany those who risk all to follow a dream. By the end of that adventure, that dream had created thousands of jobs and wealth where there was none before.

The company that he eventually created grew from a one person operation to a national company with 2500 employees and fifty-five offices in twelve states, and built and owned a fleet of thirteen 600-passenger harbor cruise vessels in major port cities throughout the United States. This is a grand story, not just about a man, but about the opportunity and promise that America still offers to those with vision and determination. Richard calls it "an adventure in capitalism."